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Cross Country 70 - Going the Other Way

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  • Cross Country 70 - Going the Other Way

    On Tuesday I flew from Cleveland one hour west to Chicago, turned around and then spent two more hours flying east to Albany. I know this sort of traveling isn’t especially unusual but it got me thinking about this trip’s post, and reminded me of my appreciation of a 1992 movie starring Billy Crystal; Mr. Saturday Night.

    If you Google “going the other way” you get 289 million hits, which I guess means that I’m not the only one thinking about this. It’s a line used recurrently in this movie, and, when I think about it, it was the one thing I really liked about the film. The line was used in reference to a way of speaking or behaving that was totally unexpected, typically in an effort to be funny and, when done with the proper timing, it certainly is.

    It’s my understanding that successful humor typically contains elements of truth combined with surprise. The truth of what we witness or hear allows us to relate personally to some aspect of the line or story and when we see ourselves in it somehow many things once considered tragic can be transformed. We know there’s a lot of therapy in there somewhere.

    So what’s the connection to therapy here? Well, it’s been my experience ten of thousands of times that ideomotion that proves corrective for the abnormal neurodynamic contains movement in a direction previously avoided. Unconsciously motivated, people “go the other way,” and aside from sensing relief they are surprised - laughter isn’t uncommon. The patient, in effect, tells a joke, entirely nonverbal but completely their own. They can relate, and that’s no small thing when someone’s suffered from the disassociation chronic pain can promote.

    When they eventually respond to their own movement and change with a smile I know there’s some hope of recovery. If not, I rarely help them.

    I rushed to finish teaching early in Scranton Pennsylvania on Friday, anticipating the foot of snow that began to descend about noon. The class got out in time but I stayed another night, trapped by forces I can’t control and usually ignore. Instead of going home I went the other way, back to my room, back to some writing I couldn’t have done on the plane.

    As usual, going the other way wakened me, and it was worth it.
    Barrett L. Dorko

  • #2
    I arrived at the Scranton airport to learn that my flight had been cancelled but that I might make my next flight 140 miles away in Philadelphia if I drove fast enough. I did.

    My luggage however has decided to “go the other way” and now, the next day, I’m still waiting for it to appear. I’m sure there must be something funny in here somewhere.

    This isn’t the first time I’ve been separated from the books I wave in front of my classes and I feel certain they’ll show. Still, there’s something about these papers that I wonder about replacing if they remain lost.

    They contain the support for all my crazy ideas. I can pick up the red file and show others why I’ve abandoned traditional thinking and coercive manual methods. I can show others why I’ve gone the other way.

    Today as I wait, I wonder what it would be like going the other way without them.
    Barrett L. Dorko

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    • #3
      Well, the luggage arrived late yesterday and all of my contrary literature was inside.

      Maybe it would have been better had I lost it.
      Barrett L. Dorko

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      • #4
        Barrett,

        Your story reminds me another gentleman, Jim_Marshall who "went the other way", or rather "went the wrong way". He is now defined by it. I think he probably gets quite a few laughs, too.

        Wes

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        • #5
          Wes, You're right. Marshall did go all the way "the other way." I always wondered if his fellow 'purple people eaters' were to slow to catch him and save him from embarressment or if they were laughing so hard they couldn't run. Anyway a great memory. Thanks from a former Viking fan. Dave

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          • #6
            Aw!
            Darn!
            Hurray!
            "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

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            • #7
              Jim Marshall played his college ball at The Ohio State University.

              Coincidence? I think not!
              Barrett L. Dorko

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              • #8
                This might help clarify my last post. You'll have to wait for act 3.
                "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

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                • #9
                  laughter

                  Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
                  ... it’s been my experience ten of thousands of times that ideomotion that proves corrective for the abnormal neurodynamic contains movement in a direction previously avoided. Unconsciously motivated, people “go the other way,” and aside from sensing relief they are surprised - laughter isn’t uncommon. The patient, in effect, tells a joke, entirely nonverbal but completely their own. They can relate, and that’s no small thing when someone’s suffered from the disassociation chronic pain can promote.

                  When they eventually respond to their own movement and change with a smile I know there’s some hope of recovery. If not, I rarely help them.
                  Barrett
                  Any thoughts on why ideomotion brings laughter with it? I get the laughter even without the 'surprise' factor when it's real ideomotion. And I don't laugh that easily myself (unfortunately). [I would consider saying that it causes some sort of 'release' but I don't want to make you gag.]

                  -Gilbert

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                  • #10
                    Gilbert,

                    Thank you for not using the word "release." I'm campaigning for its inclusion in the "banning offenses" here on Soma Simple. Originally I was going to propose a firing squad but that just sounds so angry.

                    People commonly laugh for no apparent reason and have thus acquired a habit that covers their inability to articulate a thought but seems to convey comfort and openness when it doesn't actually exist. I heard this on National Public Radio so I know it's true. This aggravates the daylights out of me for some reason and I try not to enable it. I do this with silence and small, disapproving looks. At least, I think they're small. I know how sharp they can be. My mother taught me this stuff.

                    I've asked a few patients this question recently and thought I'd try it out here:

                    Groucho Marx would say, "Walk this way." What would happen next?
                    Barrett L. Dorko

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                    • #11
                      Barrett,

                      I am constantly surprised by the beauty and elegance of your writing, you are therapeutic with words too. I would like to bring a phase that I heard another person use, so I borrowed it. A woman I met who had been seriously injured when concert light staging fell on her, breaking and dislocating her left hip. I met her four years post injury. Her phrase was "Live the Feather" meaning literally to get out of the cage and let the bird fly. I wistfully remember her because she is so cool and I wish things had worked out. Anyway I wanted to keep something of her so I looked up the Latin for Live the Feather and it translates "Ago Pluma". The interesting thing is that the literal translation in Latin doesn't match. It is "Move the Feather".

                      So from coming here this morning, reading your post and looking at my drawing of a Greek woman bearing a feather and drape on my wall. I come to the realization that I must move the feather lest I go crazy. It is my destiny.

                      Ago Pluma, Barrett, Ago Pluma.

                      Karen
                      Last edited by Karen L; 30-04-2008, 08:09 PM. Reason: spelling

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                      • #12
                        Thank you Karen.

                        Anybody got a clue what happened behind Groucho?

                        Here are two clues: This web site and mirror neurons.

                        There’s something both funny and informative in here, I promise.
                        Barrett L. Dorko

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                        • #13
                          Anybody got a clue what happened behind Groucho?
                          I always liked the Mel Brooks version (at about 0.25).

                          I enjoyed this from the site Diane posted a few days ago.
                          Last edited by Luke Rickards; 05-05-2008, 03:00 AM.
                          Luke Rickards
                          Osteopath

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                          • #14
                            Thanks Luke. What I see here is a combination of humorous activity and raging mirror neurons.
                            Barrett L. Dorko

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