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  • How to shoot an arrow through a lady

    I found this video on youtube one day, and decided to bring it to this thread. In it the magician shoots an arrow through a woman in a very convincing way. He then shows, step by step, how it's done.

    I think this is what Barrett is getting at in this thread.

    The trick itself (the manual treatment) is performed in a very straightforward looking manner, but the underpinnings (neuroscientific knowledge bases) are a complex mixture of understanding and timing. In the case of the arrow trick these involve the coordination of several people all contributing with split second timing. In the case of manual therapy, the neuroscientific knowledge bases are contributed to by hundreds of laboring researchers 24/7, continuously adding perceptions and thoughts tested through studies, then added to interaction occurring within a therapeutic context.

    I felt very well informed after this video revelation, a sense of relief to have it demystified, a bit boggled by the ingenuity it took to create it. It would improve our profession if it would let itself be demystified, permit revelations to permeate through its joint-based ideas, take a chance that although the underpinnings are complex they can go a long way toward explaining to us how and why we do what we do and get results, or don't do what we don't and still get results, whereupon nine-tenths of the current construct content could thereafter be gently or un-gently set aside as archaic - but maybe that would be too dissonant.

    [YT]_8mTae8oGfo[/YT]
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

    Comment


    • Diane,

      Thanks for this.

      I don't know about you, but I found it hilarious. I especially liked the commentator's contribution; a mix of fact and fiction that only lends the video more of a "magical" air. And I've got to incorporate some of that guy's dance-like moves into my routine (though unbuttoning my shirt should probably be left out).

      His entrance was especially intriguing, and I'm wondering what sort of rigging I might begin to travel with in order to accomplish something similar. I'm thinking of descending toward the class ala Peter Pan as opposed to ascending "from the earth." I'll get back to you on that.

      Then there's the "gorgeous assistant" issue. Nah, just not me.
      Barrett L. Dorko

      Comment


      • You could decorate all the points you want to deliver with streaming ribbons perhaps...
        Diane
        www.dermoneuromodulation.com
        SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
        HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
        Neurotonics PT Teamblog
        Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
        Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
        @PainPhysiosCan
        WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
        @WCPTPTPN
        Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

        @dfjpt
        SomaSimple on Facebook
        @somasimple

        "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

        “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

        “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

        "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

        "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

        Comment


        • I was listening to a conversation with Richard Wiseman on the Point of Inquiry podcast last night. He was asked how much of his work as skeptic, a psychologist and a researcher “is fueled by your education in the magical arts” (he was once a performing magician).

          He said, I think about 80%. You need not only to be able to understand the trick but you need to perform it in a way that engages an audience. And it’s a very weird social contract because you know a secret. You’re not going to tell the audience. Under those circumstances they would normally hate you and you need to get them to like you. So there’s a cognitive component, there’s a social component and it’s very like coming up with an experiment that engages people – you have to think from their perspective. As a magician you’re always thinking, “a) What will fool an audience? And b) Will they like me if I present it in this way?”

          He went on to speak of the secrets in magic and how that separates it from the openness of science (especially psychology) though both disciplines depend heavily on their understanding of how other people think.

          There’s a certain tension created as I explain what I know, and this tension is distinctly different depending upon the audience. In my experience, patients weren’t difficult to educate to the degree needed for recovery. They had a stake in this and my manner indicated compassion and commitment. I was obviously not hiding anything and was careful to proceed at a pace they found comfortable.

          Revealing the “secrets” of manual magic to other therapists is decidedly different. They often express suspicion and for many it’s difficult to get over the revelation that they haven’t read anything since leaving school. Looking for something to blame, they seek a cause for this, and more than once I’ve watched them target me. This requires some real contortions of logic but apparently it’s possible.

          Early in every course I employ Simple Contact on someone, revealing ideomotion and the physiologic shift concurrent with correction. Then I say, “The course is over” and I’m only partly kidding. I say, “Before lunch today everybody in here will be able to do what I just did – all you need is a little more understanding, not skill.”

          It is as if a magician were to perform a trick and then say, “Let me show you how I did that.”

          How many would a) stay to watch and/or b) really want to know?
          Barrett L. Dorko

          Comment


          • or C) be dissapointed when the magic was gone?

            Makes me think of the scene in the illusionist when the magician shows his wife, fascinated and now desperately curious, how the "bullet catch" trick is performed. She then says with dissappointment, "well that is really not that amazing, is it?"
            Cory Blickenstaff, PT, OCS

            Pain Science and Sensibility Podcast
            Leaps and Bounds Blog
            My youtube channel

            Comment


            • This link to Neurophilosophy blog must go onto this thread. The cognitive neuroscience of magic.
              Diane
              www.dermoneuromodulation.com
              SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
              HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
              Neurotonics PT Teamblog
              Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
              Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
              @PainPhysiosCan
              WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
              @WCPTPTPN
              Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

              @dfjpt
              SomaSimple on Facebook
              @somasimple

              "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

              “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

              “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

              "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

              "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

              Comment


              • Hey, I know that a lot of people would pick criss angel's levitation over David Blaine because criss is semi hot but don't you think criss' levitation is just a little bit too dramatic to be considered real. David Blaine levitates about a foot and a half which is a little too high to think it's all just an illusion but criss angel does it on buildings and stuff which makes me think it's all just fake. But Blaine does it right in front of you and a foot and a half is more believable. What do you think?

                Comment


                • Blaine lifts himself onto the toe of his foot - the one he angles expertly from his audience's sight. The "right in front of you" element actually makes this easier to hide. There's no way he rises a foot and a half.

                  Sorry if I wrecked any of this for you, whoever you are.
                  Barrett L. Dorko

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Diane View Post
                    OK, I accept that.. I was meaning, opposite of "distracting" or "gesturing."
                    I was meaning, focused and responsible. Both require a considerable amount of self-learning in the hard drive of one's own sensing and outputting brain.

                    I described it to a patient I saw this morning, who is a visual artist, as similar to contact improv dance, two nervous systems learning from and suggesting to one another.
                    I think this is relevant when we talk about touching someone:

                    Last night I watched a program about an autistic woman in her 60s who has become something of a hero in the USA with her understanding of the fear of cattle going into the abattoirs. As a result of her endeavours, the practice of shuffling cattle for slaughter any old way has been radically changed, resulting in happier animals easier to manage on the way to slaughter.
                    She also noticed that cattle in a press which totally constrained them, for example vaccination, relaxed with the high pressure on their bodies. As she has many fears and anxieties due to her condition, she put herself into a cattle press for 20 minutes and noticed her fears resolving.
                    Light touch is a real aversion to her; so she has managed her condition by building her own press, where she totally constrains herself for 20-30 minutes a week.
                    What this means I am not sure, but I thought it was interesting. Many people do not like light touch (I am one of them) and I wonder if part of the magic of touch is recognising those folk who respond to heavy pressure, and those who do not.....?

                    _____________
                    Last edited by John W; 27-02-2011, 03:59 PM. Reason: promotional link removed

                    Comment


                    • We've spoken of Temple Grandin here several times and I wrote about her in the early 90s, so, nothing new.

                      Who are you?
                      Barrett L. Dorko

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