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  • Hi Anoop,
    They jumped file. Don't worry they exist, and I'll find them.
    Cory
    Cory Blickenstaff, PT, OCS

    Pain Science and Sensibility Podcast
    Leaps and Bounds Blog
    My youtube channel

    Comment


    • Time to abandon the "tendinitis" myth.
      Khan KM, Cook JL, Kannus P, Maffulli N, Bonar SF.

      Where is the pain coming from in tendinopathy? It may be biochemical, not only structural, in origin.
      Khan KM, Cook JL, Maffulli N, Kannus P.

      I found it.:thumbs_up

      thanks anyway
      Anoop
      Anoop Balachandran
      EXERCISE BIOLOGY - The Science of Exercise & Nutrition

      Comment


      • fyi

        ...and you thought this thread was dead. Although he never came here to discuss his methodology, Ron Hruska has lent some of his writing to RE. I found this article there:

        The Left Anterior Interior Chain Pattern
        Ron Hruska, MPA, PT, Course Instructor

        Individuals experiencing symptoms at the knee, hip, groin, sacral-iliac joint, back, top of shoulder, between the shoulder blades, neck, face, or TMJ, will demonstrate inability to fully adduct, extend or flex their legs, on one or both sides of their body. They usually have difficulty in rotating their trunk to one or both directions and are not able to fully expand one or both sides of their apical chest wall upon deep inhalation.



        Cervical rotation, mandibular patterns of movement, shoulder flexion, horizontal abduction and internal rotation limitations, on one or both sides will also compliment the above findings. Postural asymmetry will be very noticeable, with one shoulder lower than the other, and continual shift of their body directed to one side through their hips.

        The pattern that is most often prevalent involves the left anterior interior chain, the right brachial chain and the right posterior back muscles (PEC) of the body. The left pelvis is anteriorly tipped and forwardly rotated. This directional, rotational influence on the low back and spine to the right, mandates compulsive compensatory movement in one or more areas of the trunk, upper extremities and cervical-cranial-mandibular muscle. The greatest impact is on rib alignment and position, therefore influencing breathing patterns and ability. It is very possible that respiratory dysfunctions, associated for example with asthma or daily, occupational, repetitive, work positions, can also influence pelvic balance and lead to a compensatory pattern of an anteriorly tipped and forwardly rotated pelvis on the left.

        Other common, objective findings secondary to compensatory physical attempts to remain balanced over this unlevel pelvis include elevated anterior ribs on the left, lowered, depressed shoulder and chest on the right, posterior rib hump on the right, overdeveloped lower right back muscle, curvature of the spine and asymmetry of the head and face.

        This particular pattern of neuromuscular imbalance is enhanced and generated usually at early ages of development in the pre-adolescent and adolescent years. Since the fibers from our diaphragm that attach to the front of low spine and our diaphragm in general is stronger on the right, we all have a tendency to shift and rotate our spine to the right sooner and more often than to the left. The liver also assists this directional pull on the spine and pelvis because it keeps the right larger diaphragm better positioned for respiratory activity. We do not have a liver on the left side. The left diaphragm leaflet is much smaller and does not have the advantage to pull the ribs up and out upon inhalation, so there is a tendency to relax the left abdominal wall. Consequently, these abdominal muscles on the left become weak.

        This pattern compliments our right dominance of extremity use, our daily shifting of weight to the right and overcompensating patterns of activity above and below our pelvic floor. Airflow for example, will generally move more easily into the left chest wall than into the right because of the rotational influence of the ribs, as previously described. Lack of underlying structural support exists on the right that does not exist on the left due to pericardium position. Rotation of the upper trunk to the left will generate less activity on the neck when in this pattern because of this dynamic, respiratory, structural phenomena. However, rotation of the upper trunk to the right limits air movement into the left chest wall. This created torque on soft tissue, secondary to movement on an imbalanced foundational structure, usually results in chronic muscle overuse, inflammation and pain, such as one would see in someone diagnosed with fibromyalgia.

        Interesting, and perhaps a clearer explanation than what was delivered previously in this thread, but I'm no closer to being convinced!
        Last edited by EricM; 03-11-2006, 03:03 PM.
        Eric Matheson, PT

        Comment


        • I have tried to be patient, but fom my point of view the members of the group here looked at one word in the name of our institute and made all kinds on generalizations and misnomers regarding what we do. We use the term posture in a way that tries to give a complete understanding that posture involves the nervous system. We are not just telling people to stand up straight. We were invited to this group to attempt to explain our philosphy, but before we even had a chance several pages of posts had already been posted labeling us as "mesodermalists", whatever that means. Our Institute provides current theory of the integration of the neuromuscular system and how that interelates and is influenced by respiration.

          Several members including the member who invited us here, labeled us, and constructed us into something we dont even profess. Our goal is to understand pathology and pathomecanics and how neuromuscular patterns are created and perpetuated. Those members who I will refer to as Don Quixote and his sidekicks were hell-bent on insisting that were were telling people that PRI related pain and posture, we don't. We relate posture with neurology. A great deal of time was spent then deconstructing "our" model of treatment. What a monumental waste of time deconstructing something that you falsely constructed. A lot of tilted windmills in this thread. I guess it served a purpose in some sort of self-fulfillment and a sense of duty that you are saving the therapy community from the those stuck in the dark ages of the orthopedic model. Let me assure you we are far past that.

          I would sincerely request that you stop relating to PRI in terms that are clearly misrepresentative and ill-informed. And could members here possibly stop labeling others. It doesn't hurt my feelings, but it is innaccurate. Let me define terms for how I practice and what that includes or does not.
          Last edited by Raulan2; 01-02-2007, 01:02 AM.

          Comment


          • Raulan,

            We are very patient, too.
            It is a fact the terms "Postural Restoration" were carefully chosen by the director of the institute.

            This "cynical" group that contains simple minds using simple techniques have big trouble to understand the jargon you use while explaining the method you practice.

            As Jon said it, it need a translation : Unfortunately once the translation is made, only a simple technique remains...

            BTW, it is sure that "Postural + Restoration" seems a weird association for many of us.
            Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
            We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

            Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
            If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
            bernard

            Comment


            • I don't know where this sudden outburst of righteous indignation came from but I can't see how it is related to the thread it was placed within. I see no "generalizations" and your theory, while unique and voluminous, lacks construct validity. That's been pointed out here and I see no need to apologize for that.

              Calling me Don Quixote confuses me even more than your intricate explanations of Postural Restoration theory and practice. Perhaps your interpretation of Cervantes is unique. It certainly doesn't make any sense given what he portrayed in the book.

              On the other hand, your vision doesn't match what many others see in the same thing, and by now that shouldn't surprise me.
              Barrett L. Dorko

              Comment


              • Neuroscience. 2010 Aug 26. [Epub ahead of print]
                Shifting the balance: evidence of an exploratory role for postural sway.

                Carpenter MG, Murnaghan CD, Inglis JT.
                Abstract

                Humans and other species are unable to stand perfectly still; their bodies continuously sway during stance even during concentrated efforts to avoid such movement. Traditionally, this phenomenon has been viewed as an inability of the central nervous system (CNS) to maintain perfect equilibrium because of its reliance on feedback from sensory signals to control corrective ground-reaction forces. Using a novel method to minimize movements of the body during stance without subject awareness, we have made the unique discovery that ground-reaction forces are generated independent of body sway, as evidenced by observations of increased centre of pressure variability when postural sway is minimized experimentally. Contrary to traditional views, our results suggest that postural sway may be used by the CNS as an exploratory mechanism to ensure that continuous dynamic inputs are provided by multiple sensory systems. This novel paradigm has the potential to significantly shift long-standing views on balance, and questions the theoretical basis behind conventional treatment strategies for balance deficits associated with age and disease.

                PMID: 20800663 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
                Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
                We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

                Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
                If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
                bernard

                Comment


                • Yay! What I suspected for a long time but had no verification of this until now.

                  Nari

                  Comment


                  • Makes total sense.
                    Diane
                    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                    @PainPhysiosCan
                    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                    @WCPTPTPN
                    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                    @dfjpt
                    SomaSimple on Facebook
                    @somasimple

                    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                    Comment


                    • Maybe we could find the full text for the SoS?
                      Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
                      We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

                      Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
                      If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
                      bernard

                      Comment


                      • Seeking stability and safety we must be watchful and exploratory in nature. This is as true of our vision as it is apparently true of other sensory mechanisms, and the research makes perfect sense.

                        Often I see therapists forcing their patients into a kind of position and use that pleases the therapist though it leads to pain and decreased efficiency in function. The therapist then justifies this effort with some fantasy about use that, it turns out, has nothing to do with the natural order of things but rather with some culturally imposed restriction.

                        These therapists should just become hairdressers and get it over with.
                        Barrett L. Dorko

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post

                          These therapists should just become hairdressers and get it over with.
                          Yup. Total operator model.
                          Diane
                          www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                          SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                          HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                          Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                          Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                          Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                          @PainPhysiosCan
                          WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                          @WCPTPTPN
                          Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                          @dfjpt
                          SomaSimple on Facebook
                          @somasimple

                          "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                          “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                          “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                          "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                          "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by bernard View Post
                            Maybe we could find the full text for the SoS?
                            I'll look. :angel:

                            Here is the link.
                            Last edited by Diane; 11-10-2010, 04:53 PM.
                            Diane
                            www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                            SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                            HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                            Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                            Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                            Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                            @PainPhysiosCan
                            WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                            @WCPTPTPN
                            Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                            @dfjpt
                            SomaSimple on Facebook
                            @somasimple

                            "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                            “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                            “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                            "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                            "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                            Comment


                            • Thanks Diane.
                              Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
                              We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

                              Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
                              If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
                              bernard

                              Comment


                              • Just read the article and it made some sense to me on a logical level with regards to what I see with patients and even with my own movements. I attended a PRI course several years ago and my take is that it seemed to focus on reprogramming the virtual body/brain mapping by engaging respiration and using unusual positions/motor tasks to reduce movement asymmetries/motor weakness due to what I assume are programming issues. The course was pretty much mechanical in its basis, which is too bad since like all other interventions, the nervous system was only a secondary thought. I only mentioned this as I was not sure how the article related to this thread and I by no means feel able to speak for the PRI people.

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