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  • Simple Contact Brochure

    Nice succinct overview Barrett. :thumbs_up
    Attached Files
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

  • #2
    Hi Barrett.

    I came over your brochure today. I read it before, but this evening I started wondering....

    Over the last couple of years I have tried to find a way to understand how I can and why I should use / apply Simple Contact.
    I'm sure it's effective, gentle and easy to include in the daily practice - but how?

    Learn how to instruct each patient in specialized
    exercises designed to resolve restricted mobility and
    autonomic imbalance
    How?

    Employ manual techniques designed to restore
    normal mobility to the nervous system
    How?

    I am in a constant-need-to-know-and-understand-mode, and I can not find answers to my questions in any thread so far (I am sure I havn't read all the right ones here in this forum - but still I need help).

    Would you like to help me on my journey in understanding how to apply SC and guiding my patients in the right direction?

    If so, please take it from the beginning........and be patient on me
    Jan K. Huus
    "Curiosity happens when we feel a gap in our knowledge" - somewhere on SomaSimple

    Comment


    • #3
      Jan,

      I appreciate your asking and sense your frustration. "How" you learn anything is a function of your own style of gathering information and the teacher's manner of presenting. I think I do well enough with the second part and would point you toward this file for some recommendations following personal experience with me.

      I also know that a simple video is in order here and wonder at my obvious resistance to doing one.

      Anyway, I'm again in contact with a major sponsor and have put together some brochure material that might gather some interest. I would love some feedback. I was going for brevity and clarity.

      Course title:

      Pain and aging - Manual care for the geriatric population

      When rehabilitation depends upon the relief of painful problems the therapist can play a lead role in recovery. While manual care and movement therapies have long been known to succeed, the neuroscience explaining that success has only recently been discovered. This workshop combines the methods applied by the instructor in several skilled nursing facilities along with readily available access to the research supporting their use. This course emphasizes appropriate documentation, efficiency and productivity in today’s geriatric settings.

      About the instructor:

      Barrett L. Dorko P.T. is well-known as a writer, clinician and instructor. Beginning with regular contributions to the print media nearly thirty years ago, Barrett has continued to write daily on the Internet about clinical life, current research and methods of management ranging from manipulative care to patient education. A unique and thoughtful practitioner now working as a staff therapist in skilled nursing facilities, he has developed a gentle manual technique called Simple Contact and has written extensively about the instinctive and corrective movement it amplifies. Combining this practice with modern neuroscience, he can explain precisely how our approach toward the patient and the education we provide can have a profound and enduring effect. He says, “For pain relief, the therapist carries their most valuable modalities with them always – their knowledge of painful problems and their hands.”

      You can find Barrett’s writing at barrettdorko.com and SomaSimple.com

      Hour by hour

      Hour 1

      Origin and Cause – An express lane to effective treatment
      • Painful processes and aging – what we don’t know
      • An introduction to ideomotion – its purpose and place in our culture
      • The neuroscience of corrective movement

      Hour 2

      Theory and outcome – their place in clinical reasoning
      • The evidence for neural tension
      • The abnormal neurodynamic
      • Flexibility and Adaptive Potential
      • Autonomic contributions to pain

      Hour 3

      Documentation and productivity – meaningful practice and efficiency in today’s healthcare system
      • Coding and billing
      • Educating your colleagues
      • Supporting research

      The application of Simple Contact – Workshop I
      • The characteristics of correction
      • Positioning for pain relief, hand placement and instinctive correction
      • The significance of context

      Lunch

      Hour 4

      Internet resources for further study
      • Forums and blogging – the future of self education
      • Relevant literature at the library

      Craftsmanship in manual care – the cellular effects of touch and reflexive effect
      • The skin as the primary entryway to the brain
      • The ectodermal perspective – essential manual care for pain


      Hour 5

      The application of Simple Contact – Workshop II
      • Case presentation
      • Clinical strategies

      Hour 6

      Evaluative form and demonstration
      • Essential and Nominal diagnosis
      • Clinical reality in the geriatric setting


      Ideas for the brochure

      Would you like to....

      - Understand how a simply stated explanation for your patient's pain problems is not only scientifically sound but will also help them begin recovery and provide relief?

      - Take the guess work out of manual therapy and let your patient's reaction to pain and movement tell you exactly what they need?

      - Explain to colleagues how helping geriatric patients respond instinctively to pain makes scientific sense'?

      - Know the facts about pain's relation to function, strength, posture and flexibility and the co morbidities common in the geriatric population?

      - Provide gentle and safe manual therapy for all your patients, avoid flare-ups, and save your own hands from harm?

      - Be at the forefront of scientific understanding in gentle manual and movement therapy?

      This is possible if five distinct ideas are explained and examined in light of the current literature. They are:
      1. The significance of neural tension
      2. The presence and purpose of ideomotion or instinctive correction
      3. Pain’s relation to the culture
      4. The skin as a direct connection to the brain
      5. Examination that is both minimal and meaningful
      Barrett L. Dorko

      Comment


      • #4
        Nice outline Barrett!
        I like how you've woven the present work you're doing into the wealth of info you have, and how you hint at improving efficiency. That's a sticky, right there.
        Diane
        www.dermoneuromodulation.com
        SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
        HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
        Neurotonics PT Teamblog
        Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
        Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
        @PainPhysiosCan
        WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
        @WCPTPTPN
        Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

        @dfjpt
        SomaSimple on Facebook
        @somasimple

        "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

        “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

        “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

        "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

        "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Diane.

          I find myself in competition with others willing to make promises they actually have no intention of keeping - and couldn't keep even if they tried. Fortunately for them the worldview of their potential audience includes what they're selling. Godin reminds us that we can't change the worldview of others, only develop a product that matches it.

          I think I've done this and my real world experience in the nursing homes/skilled nursing facilities the past couple of years allows me to talk about the therapist's and manager's concerns with the sort of authenticity I couldn't bring to my courses in the past.

          I am convinced that we can do a much better job without sacrificing productivity - and that's a promise I keep each and every day.
          Barrett L. Dorko

          Comment


          • #6
            Barrett,

            Once you get more specifics on the teaching opportunity, please let everyone here know!

            Nate
            Nate Mosher, PT, DPT, SCS, CSCS
            Board-Certified Clinical Specialist in Sports Physical Therapy

            Comment


            • #7
              Barrett,

              I really like the brochure!!

              One question, why did you choose the words "chronic pain"? I am thinking that the majority of clinicians actually think they do not work with patients in "chronic pain", thus it would not be of high interest to them.

              I will grant you that this thought process of very inaccurate, but is present nonetheless.

              Maybe removing the word "chronic" altogether.

              Gary

              PS. Any leads on courses in the Madison WIsconsin area??

              Comment


              • #8
                Barrett

                Would you consider doing a course independently without a major sponser? Robert
                "For every man the world is as fresh as it was at the first day, and full of untold novelties for him who has the eyes to see them." Aldous Huxley

                Comment


                • #9
                  Robert,

                  Absolutely.
                  Barrett L. Dorko

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Gary,

                    Where exactly in the new outline did you find the word "chronic"?

                    I just can't find it.
                    Barrett L. Dorko

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Barrett,

                      I think Gary is referring to the old Cross Country brochure attached to Diane's first post, not the new outline.
                      John Ware, PT
                      Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists
                      "Nothing can bring a man peace but the triumph of principles." -R.W. Emerson
                      “If names be not correct, language is not in accordance with the truth of things. If language be not in accordance with the truth of things, affairs cannot
                      be carried on to success.” -The Analects of Confucius, Book 13, Verse 3

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I suspected that.

                        Occasionally I will ask another therapist what they mean by "chronic" (multiple meanings) and "acute" (two distinct and unconnected meanings).

                        They really love it.
                        Barrett L. Dorko

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Barrett, I am referring to the link in Diane's post above. The title is what I think will turn many PT's off from even considering the course. The worldview that they do not work in a "pain clinic" and do not treat...or at least have to...treat patients with chronic pain.

                          Gary

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Barrett,

                            I just realized that Diane's original post for this thread is from 2006. I did not look at the posting date and the connection to the "Old Brochure". I see tht the outline you provided is new for you.

                            Now question why geriatric population? Is that current to the primary patients you are currently working with? I guess that I am looking at this in trying to better market to all PT's not just those in a particular setting. Maybe you are already putting information together for that type of presentation.

                            Gary

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I also wonder if the word 'geriatric' could be taken out of the title but included in the text appropriately, so it is not inferred that this works only for subgeriatrics - (new word.)

                              Does the title: Pain - Manual Care for People with Pain sound any better?

                              Otherwise, it sounds great.

                              Comment

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