Posted by Barrett<script language="JavaScript1.3" type="text/javascript"> document.write(timestamp(new Date(2004,3,16,9,55,0), dfrm, tfrm, 0, 0, 0, 0)); </script> (Member # 67) on 16-04-2004 16:55<noscript>April 16, 2004 09:55 AM</noscript>:

It’s been a quiet week in Cuyahoga Falls…

1) I found myself watching (and enjoying) the new show “Extreme Makeover-Home Edition” on TV this past week. It occurs to me now that this is just the latest version of the “Queen for a Day” stuff I’ve been talking about lately. The program takes a needy and deserving family living in an inadequate space, ejects the people for a week while the home is torn apart and transformed with thousands of man hours of labor and unlimited funds. It then triumphantly allows them to return, presumably to begin a better life.
It’s a neat show, and it’s popular. But I can’t help but wonder if this is a good idea, especially since it requires nothing more from the family than an expressed need. Does therapy ever offer something similar?
2) Karl Rove came to Cuyahoga Falls yesterday. He had lunch literally around the corner from my office. Perhaps it is a measure of our society’s awareness of whose running things that not a single person I’ve asked today knew who this man was. The visit was secret and the hotel wouldn’t confirm his presence. He snuck in and snuck out-no questions, no one allowed near. My well known aversion to anonymous posters on professional forums like this came to mind.
It used to be that our ideas about how to practice were something we were openly proud of. We were willing to defend our thoughts and admit our mistakes once they were pointed out. We didn’t hide behind pseudonyms we hoped were clever and mysterious. The conflict I see in these forums seems clear; they are full of people who want to be heard, who want to exert influence, but don’t want to be known. How can that be healthy? Maybe Karl could tell us. Too bad he’s not taking any questions.
3) For those of you who visit here but don’t go to the “Bullypit,” I have a request. Take a moment and look at the threads by Diane Jacobs and Nick Matheson. They are amazing, provocative, and insightful. They present enormous implications for clinical practice and academics on the most basic level. I am very grateful to these two for the work done there.
You might also note that they use their actual names.