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  • #46
    Hi Ken, I think what you said could be added to this discussion.

    Originally posted by Ken Jakalski View Post
    --seeing things that don't matter ... or coming up with wrong solutions for the things that do.
    Thanks for your insight. Everyone does see things in different angles. Pain is complex, uncertain and so is human nature.

    Was wondering how to see things that matter and then come up with right solution??

    Regards,

    Weni

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    • #47
      I've an 84 year old auntie whose feet make her suffer terribly. She is known for her impeccable fashion sense and categorically refuses to wear ''adaptive footwear'', much to the ire of my momma, with whom she winters, in Florida.

      This week in a phone convo, she talked my ear off about my auntie's bullheadedness and misplaced pride and how autie can't follow the gang the way she used to and on and on.

      I asked her: ''Maman, is it that she is getting slower or that you have grown more impatient.''

      There was a faint pause and she said: ''I'm going to think about that.''
      Carol Lynn Chevrier LMT
      " The truth is, people may see things differently. But they don't really want to. '' Don Draper.

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      • #48
        Carol Lynn,

        Your post made me think of the comfort my father found in shoes (he was about 75 at the time) and my own discovery of looser jeans.

        Fashion drives us. There are many examples of its power.
        Barrett L. Dorko

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
          Consider the legs pictured below. What questions would you like answered? How would you ask them? What would you ask them and why?

          More pictures to come.
          Barrett

          I recently had a client with a similar presentation, though less pronounced.
          The pattern was L hip IR, R shoulder IR.

          I supported him in the pattern with cushions.

          His complaint was a sore right hip in walking for about 6 months.

          This fellow loves to talk and early in our session mentioned a horrible visit to the dentist a week earlier... I could see and feel the pattern accentuating as he talked of 'drills and jaw bone fragments and blood'.

          Fortunately he felt much improved after 4 to 5 sessions, without working with his right hip.

          It made me wonder at what point in his history did his nervous system choose that particular protective pattern?
          pain is inevitable, suffering is optional

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          • #50
            Tony,

            Many things might contribute to the way we end up eventually. It's our nature to pick one and blame it.

            What you did was listen, and, despite that you're not directly paid for this, the patient will always be grateful.

            I'm supposing about that last thing.
            Barrett L. Dorko

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post

              What you did was listen, and, despite that you're not directly paid for this, the patient will always be grateful.
              Actually it was I who was grateful for the valuable information he casually offered up in conversation... it made my job easier. I'm not certain I would've had the clarity otherwise.

              Regarding my last point, I sometimes wonder whether removing a protective pattern is the best choice, whether it still serves a purpose, or whether it was a learned response sitting there redundant, in the sub-cortical regions.

              I often use the line 'this is how your CNS is organising yourself right now, and most of the time it knows what it's doing.' This generally has the desired effect.

              Barrett I've just briefly skimmed over an 'Ideomotion' and 'Simple Contact' post of yours. Can you recommend a good thread for these topics ?
              Last edited by TonyG; 03-03-2017, 08:31 PM.
              pain is inevitable, suffering is optional

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              • #52
                My website might be useful.
                Barrett L. Dorko

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
                  Consider the legs pictured below. What questions would you like answered? How would you ask them? What would you ask them and why?

                  More pictures to come.
                  Funny how we see things differently with the passage of time.

                  I see a person at rest who's not resting.
                  pain is inevitable, suffering is optional

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                  • #54
                    TonyG,

                    Time makes a difference, usually. I've been asking questions for a long time.

                    Some haunt us. I can relate.
                    Barrett L. Dorko

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                    • #55
                      Barrett

                      My post doesn't make much sense without seeing the photo you posted in the beginning of the thread.
                      I'm not sure why it (the pic) didn't appear when I quoted you?
                      pain is inevitable, suffering is optional

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                      • #56
                        The technology has overwhelmed me. Perhaps it did some time in the past but I didn't notice it.

                        I use the "overwhelmed me" line increasingly. It makes me seem more relatable, I guess.
                        Barrett L. Dorko

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